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Beware of Priests in Pastel Shirts

by Christopher A. Ferrara
April 3, 2018

I would be willing to bet that there is a direct correlation between progressivism-Modernism on the part of a Catholic cleric and his choice of a pastel blue shirt in place of the traditional black (cassocks now being entirely out of the question for thoroughly modern post-Vatican II clergy).

Take Bishop Manuel Linda, for example, whom Pope Francis has recently installed as the Bishop of Porto in Portugal:

Note the pastel blue shirt. Note also Linda’s recent declaration to the effect that a divorced and “remarried” couple cannot be said to have a family absent sexual relations between the two, and that they ought not to be expected to observe continence:

“I know that there are some remarried couples, who were previously in a canonical marriage and who later reconstructed their lives and are in another marriage that is not canonical, who for motives of faith and of interior conviction and of conscience, in fact live in sexual abstinence. But we have to ask ourselves: is that itself a family?”

“I’m convinced that it isn’t really a family. It’s one thing to have a living arrangement like I have here in the house with other people, but we’re not a family. It’s another thing to be a family. Therefore, I would not insist much on this matter of de facto sexual abstinence.”

He would “not insist much” on the Church’s constant teaching in defense of a moral norm rooted in divine law to which there are absolutely no exceptions, as Pope John Paul II insisted in conformity with the Church’s bi-millennial Tradition. What can one say?

Let’s take another example: Father Maurizio Chiodi, whom Francis recently installed as a Member of the “reformed” [i.e., completely subverted] Pontifical Academy for Life:

Note the pastel blue shirt, which Chiodi is depicted wearing during the very address in which he attacked another exceptionless moral norm rooted in divine law. Citing only Amoris Laetitia as his authority, he declared that the intrinsically evil practice of contraception is not only permissible but even obligatory in certain cases:

“If it is true that the responsibility in generating is what these [natural] methods point to, then we can understand how, in situations when natural methods are impossible or unfeasible, other forms of responsibility need to be found. There are circumstances — I refer to Amoris Laetitia, Chapter 8 — that precisely for the sake of responsibility, require contraception. In these cases, a technological intervention does not negate the responsibility of the generating relationship. The insistence of the Church’s Magisterium on natural methods cannot be interpreted, in my opinion, as a norm which is an end in itself, nor as a mere conformity with biological laws, because the norm points to an anthropology, to the good of marital responsibility.”

My reference to pastel blue shirts may seem trivial, but is it really? When a secular priest refuses to submit to the humility of wearing the traditional black, when he (of course) rejects anything as “ridiculous” as a cassock, and when he opts instead for the fashion statement of pastel blue, is he not sending an important signal about where he stands on Tradition itself?

Father Gruner was never seen in public without his cassock. The Modernist priests who are everywhere subverting the Church today would not be caught dead wearing one. But many of the young priests who have rejected the post-Vatican II revolution have returned to the wearing of the cassock and the clerical black, even if certain bishops, the old men of the revolution, have taken to literally airbrushing a young priest’s cassock out of the picture. The choice of clerical dress does indeed seem to reveal one’s interior disposition with respect to the revolution that has convulsed the Church for more than a half a century and has now reached its most critical phase, with Catholic clergy openly advocating adultery and contraception.

Beware of priests in pastel shirts. Their theology, like their dress, tends to be fashionable, which is to say heretical.  Which is to say from the pit of Hell.